The Media Eats Its Children

alexiatsotsis:

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Users of social communication networks yesterday (whether they be television or Facebook or a barstool) could not avoid the tragic news of “socialite” Peaches Geldof’s death.

My experience with Geldof is thus, once, in my 20s, I clicked on a link to a posting of nude photos of her on Gawker and came to the conclusion that a) the folks at Gawker had nothing better to do with their time b) there was someone famous whose body looked like mine.

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If you could read one thing today, let it be this.

UPS engineers found that left-hand turns were a major drag on efficiency. Turning against traffic resulted in long waits in left-hand turn lanes that wasted time and fuel, and it also led to a disproportionate number of accidents. By mapping out routes that involved “a series of right-hand loops,” UPS improved profits and safety while touting their catchy, environmentally friendly policy. As of 2012, the right turn rule combined with other improvements — for the wow factor, UPS doesn’t separate them out — saved around 10 million gallons of gas and reduced emissions by the equivalent of taking 5,300 cars of the road for a year.

i am not a fan of left turns onto busy streets either. i avoid them.

Why UPS Trucks Don’t Turn Left (via justin-singer)

shortformblog:


Anja Niedringhaus faced down some of the world’s greatest dangers and had one of the world’s loudest laughs. She photographed dying and death, and embraced humanity and life. She gave herself to the subjects of her lens, and gave her talents to the world, with images of wars’ unwitting victims in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia and beyond.
Shot to death by an Afghan policeman Friday, Niedringhaus leaves behind a body of work that won awards and broke hearts. She trained her camera on children caught between the front lines, yet who still find a place to play. She singled out soldiers from their armies as they were confronted by death, injuries and enemies’ attacks.

Niedringhaus, a Pulitzer Prize winner, was one of two Western journalists shot by the Afghan police officer ahead of the election in the country.

Seems like she predicted her own death.

shortformblog:

Anja Niedringhaus faced down some of the world’s greatest dangers and had one of the world’s loudest laughs. She photographed dying and death, and embraced humanity and life. She gave herself to the subjects of her lens, and gave her talents to the world, with images of wars’ unwitting victims in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia and beyond.

Shot to death by an Afghan policeman Friday, Niedringhaus leaves behind a body of work that won awards and broke hearts. She trained her camera on children caught between the front lines, yet who still find a place to play. She singled out soldiers from their armies as they were confronted by death, injuries and enemies’ attacks.

Niedringhaus, a Pulitzer Prize winner, was one of two Western journalists shot by the Afghan police officer ahead of the election in the country.

Seems like she predicted her own death.